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Laravel: “Allowed memory size exhausted” error during unit tests

I’ve been using in-memory testing for my projects based on Laravel every since I found this great  tutorial: http://net.tutsplus.com/tutorials/php/testing-like-a-boss-in-laravel-models/

It was working very well as my test cases increases, to a point when I’m starting to get this error message:

Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 134217728 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 16 bytes) in /Applications/AMPPS/www/project/vendor/symfony/console/Sym
fony/Component/Console/Command/Command.php on line 57

I couldn’t find the proper solution, but managed to get it working with a workaround here: http://forums.laravel.io/viewtopic.php?id=11723

We can temporarily increase the memory limit using this function:

// Temporarily increase memory limit to 256MB
ini_set('memory_limit','256M');

In my case, I needed more than 128MB of memory, so I conveniently increased it to 256MB. It depends on your usage and your hardware. Choose accordingly.

Since this is only required during my test (I follow the TDD approach, so testing comes regularly), I had added it in the TestCase class, inside method createApplication().

This is the full code in TestCase.php.

<?php

class TestCase extends Illuminate\Foundation\Testing\TestCase {

public function createApplication()
{
    // Temporarily increase memory limit to 256MB
    ini_set('memory_limit','256M');

    $unitTesting = true;
    $testEnvironment = 'testing';

    return require __DIR__.'/../../bootstrap/start.php';
}    

/**
 * Default preparation for each test
 */
public function setUp()
{
    parent::setUp();
    $this->prepareForTests();
}

/**
 * Migrates the database and set the mailer to 'pretend'.
 * This will cause the tests to run quickly.
 */
private function prepareForTests()
{
    Artisan::call('migrate');
    Mail::pretend(true);
} 

}

Laravel 4: things to note when creating Package

NOTE: This tutorial was written for Laravel version 4.0. I’ve added some notes for version 4.1 but they’re not tested yet. Do let me know if you see any problem.

When I first started using Laravel 4, I had been creating all my models, controllers and views in the root app folder. While things can get too comfortable and convenient here, it may not be a good idea to dump everything at the top. That’s when Package (or Bundle) comes in.

According to Laravel’s documentation:

“Packages are the primary way of adding functionality to Laravel.”

I found 2 great tutorials on creating your own Laravel 4 Package:

  1. http://culttt.com/2013/06/24/creating-a-laravel-4-package/
  2. http://jasonlewis.me/article/laravel-4-develop-packages-using-the-workbench

The following are some of the problems I’ve encountered and it took me quite some time to look for the solutions. Hope this will help someone else too.

1. Define your dependencies

A Package is like a sandbox module where it should contain its own dependencies (or vendors Packages). So you need to add your dependencies to your Package’s composer.json file.

As an example, I needed to include Cartalyst Sentry and Twitter Bootstrap to my Package, this is what I did under “require”:

"require": {
        "php": ">=5.3.0",
        "illuminate/support": "4.0.x",
        "cartalyst/sentry": "2.0.*",
        "twbs/bootstrap": "3.0.*"
},

 NOTE on Sentry:

After writing this blog, I’ve decided to move Sentry out of my package. Firstly, it will be cleaner and allow people using my package to choose their own authentication vendor. Secondly, I was getting so much trouble trying to get it to work properly. So it’s advisable to just put it on the Laravel app root instead.

Remember to run the following command line at your Package’s root folder:

php composer.phar update
php composer.phar dump-autoload

Note: On your first install, run “php composer.phar install”. Although using update will do the same thing too.

For dump-autoload, on the official documentation, they are using artisan instead of composer. I’m still not sure what’s the difference, but both seem to work.

php artisan dump-autoload

2. Extending Controller

When you download the Laravel 4 master, you will get a BaseController.php under the app\controllers folder. It looks something like this:

<?php

class BaseController extends Controller {

    /**
    * Setup the layout used by the controller.
    *
    * @return void
    */
    protected function setupLayout()
    {
        if ( ! is_null($this->layout))
        {
            $this->layout = View::make($this->layout);
        }
    }
}

And then all your custom controllers will extend this BaseController like this:

class CustomController extends BaseController {}

If you copy and paste this BaseController to your Package, it will not work. The Package will try to find “Controller” in your namespace Vendor\Package.

So to make it work, you must first define BaseController under your namespace, and then let Package knows that it needs to find the correct Controller.

In short, use this:

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

use \Illuminate\Routing\Controllers\Controller;

class BaseController extends Controller {

     /**
     * Setup the layout used by the controller.
     *
     * @return void
     */
    protected function setupLayout()
    {
        if ( ! is_null($this->layout))
        {
            $this->layout = View::make($this->layout);
        }
    } 
}

Note for Laravel 4.1:

In Laravel 4.1, the Controller path has been moved. See http://laravel.com/docs/upgrade

Use this instead:

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

use \Illuminate\Routing\Controller;

class BaseController extends Controller {

     // Your code
}

3. Using Sentry in your Package

Just to be clear, as some readers mistaken “Sentry” as my Package’s name. It’s a third party Package created by Cartalyst: “Sentry is a simple, powerful and easy to use authorisation and authentication package.” I wanted to include this third party Package in my custom Package to add authorisation and authentication capability.

But once Sentry is downloaded and installed to my Package, I still couldn’t get it to recognise the alias “Sentry”. So the following code produces an error:

Sentry::logout();

The FatalErrorException message was:

Class ‘Vendor\Package\Sentry’ not found

That’s right, the Package has mistakenly treated Sentry under my Package’s namespace.

If you remember from Laravel’s basic documentation, while in the app’s root folder, we can define aliases such as “Sentry” in the \app\config\app.php file. But there doesn’t seem to have any way to register that in my Package.

So what I did, as a workaround, is to include the namespace at the top of my file. Like this:

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

use Cartalyst\Sentry\Facades\Laravel\Sentry;

class CustomController extends BaseController {
    public function logOut()
    {
        Sentry::logout();
    }
}

Works like charm! But if you know of a shorter and better way, please leave me a message!

Better solution (edited)

Thanks to hardik dangar, there’s actually a shorter way to do this. Simply add a backslash before Sentry so that php doesn’t search Sentry within my namespace.

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

class CustomController extends BaseController {
    public function logOut()
    {
        \Sentry::logout();
    }
}

4. Using Illuminate Facades

Just as you thought everything is well and ready to code, you found yourself stuck at this line!

return View::make('vendorpackage::users/view');

And the FatalErrorException message is:

Class ‘Vendor\Package\View’ not found

What the?!

The same goes to Redirect, Input and Validator.

Base on my previous experience with Sentry, I got just the right idea.

Simply add the following to the top of your code:

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Validator;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Redirect;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\Input;
use Illuminate\Support\Facades\View;

class CustomController extends BaseController {

Tada!!

Better solution (edited)

Thanks to hardik dangar, there’s actually a shorter way to do this. Simply add a backslash before View so that php doesn’t search View within my namespace.

return \View::make('vendorpackage::users/view');

5. Using Views in your Package

That right, you didn’t see it wrongly. This is how you call your Package’s view.

For example, we want view “users\view”, add your Package’s name to the front like this:

View::make('vendorpackage::users/view');

Then how about using master layout? Same logic, like this:

@extends('vendorpackage::layouts.master')

Where the directory is:

workbench\yourvendor\yourpackage\src\views\layouts\master.blade.php

6. Extending Eloquet in your own model

Laravel documentation taught us this:

class User extends Eloquent {}

This won’t work in a Package. Instead, you should do this:

<?php namespace YourVendor\YourPackage;

use Illuminate\Database\Eloquent\Model;

class User extends Model {}

7. Using Controller in your Package

This used to work:

{{ Form::open(array('action' => 'UserController@postStore')) }}

But to use your Package’s Controller, you need to add your Vendor\Package namespace to the Controller like this:

{{ Form::open(array('action' => 'YourVendor\YourPackage\UserController@postStore')) }}

8. Loading Package Config file

If you want to create a separate database for your package, you can define your database configuration within your package directory:

workspace\vendor\packagename\src\config\database.php

Then add this to the package service provider boot() method:

public function boot()
{
    $this->package('vendor/package');
    include __DIR__."/routes.php";

    // Add my database configurations to the default set of configurations                        
    $this->app['config']['database.connections'] = array_merge(
        $this->app['config']['database.connections']
       ,Config::get('package::database.connections')
    );
}

Source: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15304722/eloquent-laravel-4-package-database-configuration-format

9. Loading external package within Providers and Aliases

In normal circumstances, when we add a new package to a Laravel installation, we would edit the config/app.php by adding the package namespace within the “Providers” and “Aliases” arrays.

However, when we need to add another external package that is a requirement within our own custom package, we wouldn’t want our users to edit a long lists of Providers and Aliases. Ideally, they should only include our custom package.

I’ve been searching for awhile and finally found a solution from this forum.

Solution:

In this example, we want to add an external package call “Markdown”.

In the file myLaravelProject/workbench/my-vendor/my-package/src/MyVendor/MyPackage/MyPackageServiceProvider,

put this in the boot() method:

$this->app->register('SomeExternalPackage\Markdown\MarkdownServiceProvider');

and this in the register() method:

$this->app->booting(function()
{
    $loader = \Illuminate\Foundation\AliasLoader::getInstance();
    $loader->alias('MyPackage', 'MyVendor\MyPackage\Facades\MyPackage');
    $loader->alias('Markdown', 'SomeExternalPackage\Markdown\Facades\Markdown');
});

10. Override config files of package

If you want to be able to allow the users who use your package to publish and modify the package’s config files, following this tutorial:

How to override config files of Laravel 4 package

Missing notes for Laravel 4

Tutorial: Missing notes for Laravel 4

Note: This is an on-going blog. I’ll be updating it whenever I have new findings for Laravel 4.

I had been learning CodeIgniter and CakePHP for some time now when I chanced upon this new(er) framework called Laravel (http://laravel.com) via Twitter.

I’m not going to tell you how wonderful it is, but here’re some references:

There’s an official documentation and another one which is almost recommended everywhere I googled.

The thing is, the official documentation isn’t very complete. It covers most of the basics, but when you want to dig deeper, you’ll get lost. The other recommended tutorial site is almost outdated. I couldn’t find some of the things when I’m comparing it to the official documentation.

So I’m taking notes on the things that I’ve found out (either through googling or the official API documentation). Here we go:

1. Form::open_for_files() is outdated

If you’re trying to create a form for uploading files, the old way was to open the form with Form::open_for_files().

It isn’t clear in the official documentation or the API that we should now use the same Form::open() but now with an additional argument ‘file’ => true.

{{ Form::open(array('action' => 'UploadController@postImage','files'=>true)) }}

2. Using Input::file()

You must always set ‘files’ => true in the Form::open() otherwise Input::file() will never work.

3. Getting filename from Input::file()

There were many tutorials saying that the following will return the filename of the upload file. But it didn’t work for me.

$filename_neverwork_forme = Input::file('image.name');

Instead, use this to get the filename of the upload file.

$filename_worked = Input::file('image')->getClientOriginalName();

Of course, using the filename directly without verification is dangerous. But that’s up to you to decide.

4. Redirect with validation error message and inputs

I realize most methods with underscores are outdated.

So this is wrong:

return Redirect::to('form/create')->with_errors($validation)->with_input();

This is the correct method:

return Redirect::to('form/create')->withErrors($validation)->withInput();

5. Getting URL of a location using URL::to()

To get the full URL of any location or route, simply use URL::to().

For example, if you need the URL of the route ‘about’

{{ URL::to('about') }}

Note: Remember to set your route.php correctly. This function depends on that.

6. Checking current location with Request::is()

I needed to track the current location so that I can mark the corresponding navigation button as active. In this case, you can use Request::is().

Example

@if ( Request::is('about') )
    <li class='active'>
@else
    <li>
@endif
        <a href='{{ URL::to("about") }}'>About</a>
    </li>

 7. Get distinct values from a table column

I had a list of string from a table column that can be repeated. So I needed to query the database to give me an array of string which are distinct.

This is how you can do it:

DB::table('tableName')->select('columnName')->distinct()->get()

 8. Using Mail::send()

This is quite frustrating because the official documentation didn’t describe how to use the $data parameter which is required when using Mail::send().

Found this very good tutorial:

http://maxoffsky.com/code-blog/sending-e-mail-with-laravel-4-using-mail/

 9. Deploying your Laravel project to a shared hosting

Reference: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16683046/how-to-install-laravel-4-to-a-web-host-subfolder-without-publicly-exposing-app

9.1 Look for your root or home directory

If you’re not sure where is your root or home directory, login to your shared hosting’s cpanel (control panel) and look for the Home Directory. It’s usually something like “/home/domainname”.

9.2 Create a new folder to host the protected Laravel files

We need to create a new folder in the root directory so that they’re not accessible to public. Under the root directory (e.g. /home/domainname/ or example.com), create a folder “applications”.

Under “applications”, create a folder with your project name (e.g. project_name) and place all your Laravel files (except the “public” folder) into this folder.

9.3 Public folder

Put all your files inside Laravel’s public folder into /home/domainname/public_html/project_name.

9.4 Final folder structure

The end result of the folder structure will look like this:

- /home/domainname
    - applications
        - project_name
            - app
            - bootstrap
            - vendor
            - artisan
            - composer.json
            - phpunit.xml
            - server.php
    - public_html
        - project_name

9.5 Edit Laravel’s /bootstrap/paths.php

I was very lost how many “../” I need to add in order to get to the correct path. So we won’t use __DIR__ at all. We’re going to define the full path base on the root directory so that there’s no confusion.

So change from this:

return array(
    'app'     => __DIR__.'/../app', 
    'public'  => __DIR__.'/../public',
    'base'    => __DIR__.'/..',
    'storage' => __DIR__.'/../app/storage',
);

To this:

return array(
    'app'     => '/home/domainname/applications/project_name/app', 
    'public'  => '/home/domainname/public_html/project_name',
    'base'    => '/home/domainname/applications/project_name',
    'storage' => '/home/domainname/applications/project_name/app/storage',
);

9.6 Edit Laravel’s /public/index.php

Same as the point above, we’re not going to use __DIR__. Let’s change all the path to full path.

From this:

require __DIR__.'/../bootstrap/autoload.php';
$app = require_once __DIR__.'/../bootstrap/start.php';

To this:

require '/home/domainname/applications/project_name/bootstrap/autoload.php'; 
$app = require_once '/home/domainname/applications/project_name/bootstrap/start.php';

9.7 Edit .htaccess

If your shared hosting’s default PHP version is < 5.3.7 but they support higher versions, you can edit the .htaccess file inside the “public” folder.

For Mac users, you can access it via the Terminal.

Use this command to go to the folder

cd your/laravel/path/public

Then list hidden files with this command

ls -a

You should see .htaccess there. By default, this file is protected. In order to change it, you need to open it using super user like this:

sudo open -e .htaccess

Note: -e means open with text editor.

Then append this line to the bottom and save it.

AddHandler application/x-httpd-php53 .php

Or if you want version 5.4

AddHandler application/x-httpd-php54 .php

Upload the updated .htaccess to the public_html/project_name folder and you’re done!

10. Returning view with Error message

When you need to return to a page with error messages (especially if you use validation), you can pass the error messages back to a view with this:

return Redirect::to('form')->withErrors($validation)->withInput();

However, if you need to return an error that is not captured in Laravel’s validation, for example, I needed to check if the reCAPTCHA returns a matching input, you can create a new MessageBag and return that error messages instead.

$errors = new IlluminateSupportMessageBag;
$errors->add('customError', "The reCAPTCHA wasn't entered correctly.");
return Redirect::to('form')->withErrors($errors)->withInput();

But what if you have both validation and custom message? This is how I’ll do it: first, check that validation has passed, if not, return with validation error messages. Then, check that, in my case, reCAPTCHA is matching, if not return that error message.

Example:

if( !$validation->passes() )
{
    return Redirect::to('form')->withErrors($validation)->withInput();
}

// CAPTCHA was entered incorrectly
if (!$reCaptcha->is_valid) {
    $errors = new IlluminateSupportMessageBag;
    $errors->add('reCaptcha', "The reCAPTCHA wasn't entered correctly.");
    return Redirect::to('form')->withErrors($errors)->withInput();
}

11.Creating a Package

Reference:

Important commands:

  1. To generate the class map of package:
    composer dump-autoload
  2. To move package’s assets into public/packages:
    php artisan asset:publish --bench="vendor/package"

12. Laravel requires Mcrypt PHP extension

If you’re using Mac like me, the default PHP installed on the Mac doesn’t insclude Mcrypt extension. I’m using MAMP for development and testing, so I followed this method and it worked for me.

Reference: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16830405/laravel-requires-the-mcrypt-php-extension

Enter “which php” in terminal to see which PHP you are using.

which php

By default, Mac uses PHP from this path:

/usr/bin/php

If it’s not the PHP version from MAMP, you should edit or add .bash_profile under user root document (cd ~).

In .bash_profile, add following line (your MAMP version may be different, so does your PHP version. Check it up on the folder /Applications/MAMP/bin/php/):

export PATH=/Applications/MAMP/bin/php/php5.4.4/bin:$PATH

And restart Terminal to see which PHP you are using now. And it’ll be working by now.

13. Using lists for Form::select()

The shorter way to populate an array to be used in Form::select() is using query builder ‘lists’ to retrieve just the id column and a value column.

For example:

$select_array = Classname::lists('name', 'id');

Read the link below for more tips about this trick.

Laravel 4: Using query builder lists for Form::select

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